Haji on Trump: “If He Wins the Presidency, How are My Wife and Kids Going to Come to This Country?”

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Haji on Trump: “If He Wins the Presidency, How are My Wife and Kids Going to Come to This Country?”

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These are the real Americans.

A shocking moment of honesty from haji.

Buffalo News:

Aden Ali of Buffalo has a lot riding on the outcome of the presidential election. The Somali immigrant has a wife and two children in Kenya, awaiting clearance to join him here.

But Donald Trump says he wants to block Muslim refugees from entering the United States, and Ali, who is Muslim, worries about the possibility if Trump is elected president.

“If he wins the presidency, how are my wife and kids going to come to this country?” said Ali, who works as a machine operator at a local chocolate maker.

A Donald Trump Presidency would mean fewer Somalians.

This is a friggin crisis.

August 1992 - Berdale, Somalia - A starving child, so weak from hunger that he collapsed, is helped to his feet at Berdale.   Photo Credit: ANDREW HOLBROOKE/CORBIS

August 1992 - Berdale, Somalia - During the height of the Somalia famine, starving children line up to receive food at a feeding station in Berdale.  More than 300,000 people died of hunger. Phot Credit: ANDREW HOLBROOKE/CORBIS

We need these people.

Community advocate Nimo Yonis leads a protest chant against the mayor of Lewiston, Maine, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012. Critics of the mayor delivered petitions asking for his resignation because of comments he made about Somali refugees in his city. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

They are the lifeblood of this country, just like George Washington said.

It’s why Republicans are unlikely to find much support from Western New York’s large and growing Somalian community. “Ninety percent of us are Democrats,” said Ali Ahmed, who owns a Somali market on Grant Street.

Muslims more broadly in Western New York have gravitated heavily toward the Democratic party, too.

“There’s definitely a real fear of, what is our future in this country?” said Mohammed Shariff, 20, of Clarence Center. “The stakes are high and the stakes are real.”

Yes.

Serious as a heart-attack, haj.

A prejudice against Muslims in American politics and policy that once was subtle and behind the scenes is now open and accepted within the GOP, added Shariff, a senior at the University at Buffalo,

“It’s no longer implicit, it’s explicit,” he said.

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The rhetoric “has definitely been a catalyst” for more Muslims to mobilize politically, said Shariff, who has gone door to door campaigning on behalf of Bernie Sanders.

Among Muslims, there is substantial debate about whether to support Sanders or Hillary Clinton.

Shariff said he believes Sanders has been more consistent than Clinton on issues that affect Muslim Americans. Sanders, he said, voted no on the war in Iraq and on the Patriot Act, while as a New York senator, Clinton voted in favor of both.

Remember, issues which affect “Moslem Americans” are real and valid.

In contrast with issues which affect White Americans, the discussion of which is pure evil.

Ali arrived in the United States as a refugee 15 years ago and is now a naturalized citizen and eligible to vote.

Other Muslims said Trump and Cruz’s proposals were not in keeping with the American tradition of religious freedom, which is admired worldwide.

“They’re not supposed to watch for the religion. They’re supposed to watch for the criminal,” said Omar Hasan, a Somalian refugee who arrived in Buffalo via South Africa about three years ago. “How do they know this is a Muslim, this isn’t a Muslim?”

Taraq Khan immigrated from Kashmir in 1987 and built a successful ethnic market in Amherst, Super Bazaar, with his brother Afqan.They’re confident that the real will of the American people will shine through at election time and beyond.

Dues Vult.

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